FALL BUCKET LIST

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By: Angy Talbot (ECFE Blog Writer/Discovery Learning Teacher)

I love making lists and a bucket list is especially fun. Each month I make a list of ideas for the season. I get lots of inspiration from Pinterest and fun activities that we have done as a family each year. Here is a fun filled Bucket List for Fall:

• Go on a hayride
• Go to a pumpkin patch
• Make an apple or pumpkin pie
• Have a campfire
• Go to an apple orchard
• Stay up until dark and watch the stars and moon
• Drink apple cider hot or cold (depending on the weather)
• Make a pile of leaves and jump in it
• Go to your local high school football game
• Go through a corn maze
• Collect acorns and leaves
• Watch Halloween kids movies – My favorite is, “It’s the Great Pumpkin Charlie Brown”
• Leaf rubbings with crayons
• Break out the fall wardrobe and jackets
• Fly a kite
• Run/walk a mini-marathon
• Go to the farmers market
• Decorate the house in fall colors and window decals
• Make homemade soup with the kids
• Go trick or treating
• Roast pumpkin seeds
• Carve pumpkins
• Make pinecone bird feeders
• Host a Halloween party
• Make a costume from scratch
• Send homemade Halloween cards
• Bob for apple
• Make Carmel apples
• Plant a tree
• Take family photos outside
• Visit a farm
• Go to a fall festival
• Take a hike
• Go on a leaf drive during the leaf color peak
• Read outside
• Picnic in the park
• Take a flashlight walk at night
• Plant fall flowers
• Make S’mores
• Ride Bikes
• Make a gratitude jar
• Photo shot in Halloween costumes
• Play outdoors whenever possible
• Go to the zoo
• Donate to the food bank
• Enjoy the weather!

What’s on your Fall Bucket List?

Spring Bucket List

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By: Angy Talbot (ECFE Blog Writer)

There are so many fun activities to do in the spring. We have had a bucket list for every season except spring…until now! Spring is the time of year when we’re all ready to get outside and play. The spring season is always welcomed after the snow and cold. It’s exciting to see all the changes outside to the buds forming, flowers blooming and birds chirping. Children especially love to see the Earth transform right before their eyes. As stated by Robin Williams -“Spring is natures way of saying, let’s party!” Here is our bucket list to get the party started:
1. Plant Flowers
2. Blow Bubbles
3. Fly a Kite
4. Raise a caterpillar into a butterfly
5. Start a vegetable garden
6. Go mini-golfing
7. Paint a picture with watercolors outside
8. Go for a bike ride
9. Feed ducks or geese at a lake or pond
10. Have an outdoor family game night
11. Make a birdfeeder
12. Make pictures with sidewalk chalk on the driveway
13. Spend time cloud gazing
14. Pick lilacs or wild flowers
15. Go stargazing
16. Take a walk through a park
17. Dance in the rain
18. Visit a zoo
19. Go horseback riding
20. Have a picnic
21. Have a family photo shoot outside
22. Visit an Arboretum
23. Feed baby animals
24. Take a trip to the garden store
25. Shop at the Farmer’s Market
26. Visit a new park
27. Visit a Minnesota State Park
28. Measure the rain
29. Volunteer!
30. Plant seeds
31. Try a new lemonade recipe
32. Visit an animal shelter
33. Go to the museum on a rainy day
34. Hold a worm
35. Go barefoot in the grass
36. Go puddle jumping
37. Build a small fairy garden
38. Sleep with the windows open
39. Story time outside
40. Listen to the birds
41. Skip rocks
42. Take a trip somewhere you have never been before
43. Watch a sunset
44. Watch a sunrise
45. Send a family member a letter or postcard
46. Go fishing
47. Go camping
48. Have a bonfire
49. Make smoothies
50. Grill out
51. Smell the flowers
52. Plan an arts and crafts day inside or out
53. Read a book about spring
54. Have an ice-cream social
55. Wear sunglasses
56. Swing in a hammock
57. Nature scavenger hunt
58. Go to a TWINS game!
59. Plant flowers in flower pots
60. Play a game outside like kickball
61. Play badminton
62. Frisbee
63. Outdoor concert
64. Canoe
65. Spring cleaning
66. Change out winter clothes to spring wardrobes
67. Rollerblade or roller skate
68. Fill a sketchbook with sights outside
69. Go to the library
70. Visit a farm
71. Make spring play dough to play outside
72. Take photos in the rain
73. Wash the car
74. Shop at a Flea Market
75. Do Yoga
76. Plan your summer vacation and research sights and activities
77. Start a DIY project
78. Make a kid friendly salad
79. Eat strawberry shortcake
80. Have an outdoor tea party
81. Look for bugs
82. Play tag
83. Go bird watching
84. Play catch
85. Jump rope
86. Eat dirt pudding
87. Play hopscotch
88. Make a paper airplane
89. Visit a fire station
90. Find tadpoles
91. Go to garage sales
92. Try grilled fruit
93. Ride on a train
94. Climb a tree
95. Paint rocks
96. Make an outside fort
97. Have a dance party outside
98. Start a collection of nature items
99. EXPLORE
100. Make everyday, the BEST day!

What’s on your spring bucket list?

Expression Through Art

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By: Angy Talbot, ECFE Blog Writer

Art is more than something exquisite or interesting; art can be an expression of someone’s soul.  Art can tell a story, make you feel, and keep you guessing.  There are many ways an artist can express themselves through painting, sculpture, drawing, collage, and art can be produced from any media imaginable.  There are many types of art and numerous ways that one could present an art piece.  When you paint a picture, you need to decide the type of paint you will use, the type of material you will be painting on, and the images you would like to paint.  There are many different elements that one can express through their art.  Many people, who do not consider themselves artists, would even be surprised at what they are capable of producing.  It is about the experimentation and enjoyment of the process while making something with your own hands.

Children enjoy participating in art activities.  Children can express what they may not be able to say in words sometimes through the use of a painting or drawing.  Art gives children the ability and the chance for them to produce their own creations.  Art is different than crafts.  “Art is open-ended with no specific end-product in mind; children are allowed to use materials in any way they choose” (NAEYC).  In the Discovery Classrooms, children are given the opportunity to use art materials how they wish from watercolors, paints, crayons, glue, scissors, play-dough, stamps, collage, clay, constructing, just to name a few items used.  The child doesn’t copy what the adult has made, but creates what they desire.  The process that a child goes through in creating art is more important than the end artifact.  By giving children many different ways to express themselves, this will help unlock their hidden talents or help the little artist to explore.  Children need to be given the opportunity to discover through various art materials.  Art is not about all children making one particular project.  Art is about self-expression, creativity, imagination, critical thinking, and problem solving.  Art is a beautiful way to express ideas, thoughts, and feelings.

As stated from, The Creative Curriculum for Preschool in the chapter titled, ArtLetter To Families:

Art is an important part of our curriculum.  Every day, children find a variety of art materials available on our shelves.  Drawing, painting, pasting, molding, and constructing are not only enjoyable but also provide important opportunities for learning.  Children express their ideas and feelings, improve their coordination, learn to recognize colors and textures, and develop creativity and pride in their accomplishments by exploring and using art materials.

When children are engaged in art activities, we talk with them about what they are doing and ask questions that encourage them to think about their ideas and express feelings.

We are just as interested in the creative process as we are in what children make.

What are some ways you incorporate art with your child?

Here are some other resources on art:

The Creative Arts Curriculum

http://www.naeyc.org/yc/pastissues/2004/july

Art vs. Crafts

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/u/MaryAnn-Kohl-Arts-Crafts/379002813/

Preschool Process And Product Art Defined

http://suite101.com/article/process-and-product-art-for-preschoolers-a122456

Winter Family Fun List

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By: Angy Talbot (ECFE Blog Writer)

Finally, we can enjoy the snow and have some winter excitement! There are so many great activities you can do with the family during the winter months. Here’s an entertaining list of ideas you can do with the kiddos indoors when the weather gets cold and ways to have a blast outside!
• Build a snowman or snow family
• Go sledding or tubing
• Go ice-skating
• Have a snowball fight
• Pajama day
• Movie marathon day
• Bake cookies
• Go through old photo albums of your childhood with the kids
• Look through family pictures or watch home movies
• Get up early and go out to breakfast
• Family game night
• Take a walk in the snow (especially when snowing)
• Sit by a fire indoors or out
• Go to the local community center for open swimming
• Go ice-fishing
• Catch snowflakes on your tongue
• Indoor or outdoor scavenger hunt
• Spa day at home
• Do arts and crafts
• Donate canned goods to a food shelf
• Have a dance contest
• Make funny home videos
• Sip homemade hot chocolate
• Take pictures in the snow
• Play with play dough
• Build an indoor fort with blankets and pillows
• Build a snow fort or igloo
• Make paper snowflakes
• Assemble a jigsaw puzzle
• Make bird feeders
• Snuggle under the blankets with a good book
• Make apple cider
• Play in the snow and make snow angels
• Take a bubble bath
• Draw self-portraits
• Go to the library
• Donate old clothes and toys to charity
• Go to a local hockey game
• See a play
• Go to the movies (don’t forget to get popcorn)
• Have an indoor picnic
• Create snow paintings (try water colors in the snow)
• Bake bread
• Find animal tracks
• Make different types of tracks in the snow
• Make popcorn and try different toppings
• Take a train ride
• Go to a museum
• Go to the zoo
• Have breakfast for dinner
• Blow bubbles outside
• Plan your summer family vacation
• Make homemade pizza
• Visit an indoor bounce house
• Go to the roller rink
• Make a meal from another country or culture
• Learn to say, “I love you” in different languages
• Go to a planetarium
• Give to those in need or volunteer together as a family
• Winter star gaze
• Shovel snow (let the kids help, small shovels work great)
• Go bowling
• Go play ball in an indoor gym
• Take a scenic drive
• Enjoy a sunset
• Make New Year’s Resolutions
• Take a family NAP

Family Connections

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By: Angy Talbot (ECFE Blog Writer)

In our fast paced world it can be difficult to stay engaged and linked with our families. With technology at our fingertips, extra curricular activities and over loaded schedules, families are so busy that dedicated family time has become a challenge. Listed below are some tips and suggestions that you can do with your family to increase that bonding time with your loved ones:

  1. Family Meals: Dinnertime is a wonderful opportunity to stay connected and promotes togetherness. By sharing a meal, you also share conversations. It is also a good time to model table manners and mealtime rules. You can involve the children in the preparation of the meal and the clean up. Even if you can’t have dinner together every night, try to plan a few meals a week were everyone can attend.
  2. Family Movies: Rent a movie and watch it before bed, go out to a movie or watch movies that the family made. Make a big bowl of popcorn or a traditional family treat.
  3. Family Game Night: Board games to cards can be great fun. Each family member could have an opportunity to pick a game the family will play each week. You can share and teach new games or play traditional family favorites.
  4. Family Walk Or Bike Ride: Even if it’s a short brisk around the block or a hike in the woods, walking and biking promotes exercise and gets the family together.
  5. Volunteering: Volunteer as a family. There are so many organizations that could greatly use some extra hands. It can be a lot of fun packing food for those in need or helping shovel a neighbor’s driveway.
  6. Art and Crafts: Decorate mugs, paint or color together.
  7. Read A Book: Each night before bed cuddle up with a story. When your children get older, you can all sit next to each other under the covers reading your own book.
  8. Bake Or Cook: This can be an opportunity to share family recipes, teach basic cooking skills and create new dishes together. Children can also help look up new recipes to try. You can later make a cookbook of all the families favorite recipes.
  9. Go Somewhere: Go to a museum, zoo, bowling or roller-skating. There are many family public outings to enjoy from the arts to sport events.
  10. Family Meetings: Set a time in the week when the family gets together and meets to discuss upcoming events, family decisions and discussions while giving each family member an opportunity to share.

There are many ways you can incorporate family time into your weekly schedule. When it comes to family time, the most important element is to do activities that the whole family will take pleasure in and to plan that time where you can all just enjoy each others company. “Time to turn off the iPad, put away the smart phone and just enjoy being where you are when you are with your family!”

 

Hands-On Math for Preschoolers

By: Ms. Angy, ECFE Blog Writer

preschooler and mathThree years ago our Discovery Preschool Programs adopted a new math curriculum called, Real Math – Building Blocks.  Real Math is, “the first program to fully integrate all five strands of mathematical proficiency as defined by today’s research.”  The five key proficiencies that students need to achieve math stated by the Real Math curriculum are:

  1. Understanding: Comprehending mathematical concepts, operations, and relations – knowing what mathematical symbols, diagrams, and procedures mean.
  2. Computing: Carrying out mathematical procedures, such as adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing numbers flexibly, accurately, efficiently, and appropriately.
  3. Applying: Being able to formulate problems mathematically and devise strategies for solving them using concepts and procedures appropriately.
  4. Reasoning: Using logic to explain and justify a solution to a problem or to extend from something known to something not yet known.
  5. Engaging: Seeing mathematics as sensible, useful, and doable.

The Real Math curriculum combines skill-building and problem-solving instruction that includes technology.  Each child is given access to mathematical games, which can be found on the real math website.  Since the children login to their own account, each child’s successes and progress can be monitored.  This technology resource helps take the classroom to the next level while giving parent’s a great alterative for their child’s computer use at home.  Every Discovery classroom has a computer available for the children to use during class time.  The children greatly enjoy playing these different math games on the computer, which has provided a variation to learning diverse math skills.  “Technology opens the door to mathematical understanding and application that will prepare students for the real world.”

Each day children engage in whole group math activities, small group math activities, and hands on learning in the math center.  Each week the children learn and practice a math concept from counting, learning about shapes, measuring, patterns, number recognition, sorting, classifying, adding and subtracting small numbers, and much, much more!  Overall, the children are learning through hands on activities and teacher directed instruction, while children’s progress is monitored.

As a preschool teacher, I have enjoyed using this math curriculum.  This program offers support and training for teachers.  The lessons are very thorough, nicely prepared, and can be easily implemented into any classroom setting.  I feel it is very important for children at a young age to develop and understand numerous math skills.  The children are often applying and learning math concepts without even realizing it.  The activities are engaging and very age appropriate.  I want children to feel confident in math and think of it as fun!  “Quality mathematics is a joy, not a pressure.  It emerges from children’s play, their curiosity, and their natural ability to think.”  For more information on the Real Math curriculum please go to:

www.realmath.com

How do you apply math concepts at home?

D.I.Y. For Kids

towelBy Ms. Angy, ECFE Blog Writer

Quite often parents will ask me what they can do at home to help prepare their child for school.  One suggestion I always mention is to have their child begin to help out at home and do more things on their own.  At home, children can start by cleaning up after themselves.  If they take something out, they can put it away right after they are done using it.  I know as a parent and teacher, I have found myself often putting away items I never used myself.  Even if it is easier for you to pick up the mess, it is better for children to learn this responsibility.  Children can also help out with many household chores.  Some suggestions are:

  • Folding small washcloths and towels when doing laundry.
  • Helping with setting the table for meals.
  • Helping with making their beds.
  • Cleaning up their place setting after a meal.
  • Helping with pets such as feeding them.
  • Getting a child-size broom or shovel so they can help with sweeping and shoveling.
  • Pour their own water for drinking while using child-size pitchers and cups.
  • Helping with putting away groceries or dishes.
  • Washing dishes (it is fun to wash by hand from time-to-time even though you may have a dishwasher and children will better understand the concept of how things get from dirty to clean).

Not only is it valuable to show children how to take care of their environment, it is equally as important to inform children as to how they can take care of themselves.  Taking care of themselves not only will help them to achieve independence, but helps to develop self-confidence and pride.  It is helpful for children to practice getting ready in the morning from getting dressed, helping to pick out their own clothes, and brushing their hair and teeth.  They may still need some assistance from an adult, but giving them the opportunities to practice and try it on their own will help them to become self-sufficient.

Some basic self-help skills are:

  • Carrying their backpack/book bag to school.
  • Washing their hands before meals or after using the bathroom.
  • Wiping their nose and washing their hands after.
  • Practicing with putting on their winter outdoor gear from snow pants, boots, to jackets.
  • Practicing with buttons and zippers.
  • Putting on their shoes and clothes.
  • Taking care of their own personal hygiene needs from combing their hair to washing their face.

I read a quote once that I often refer to as a teacher and mother, “Never help a child with a task at which he feels he can succeed” by Dr. Maria Montessori.  The key is showing children age-appropriate responsibilities for the environment and themselves by introducing new skills as they develop.  A great resource is an article titled, Teaching Your Child to Become Independent with Daily Routines, gives many suggestions and helpful tools in self-help skills for children.  You can download it at:

csefel.vanderbilt.edu/documents/teaching_routines.pdf.

What are some things you do at home to encourage your child’s independence?